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PROFESSIONAL DOCTORATE DUAL DEGREE CURRICULUM

AIMC Berkeley’s Dual Degree Program offers a rigorous and comprehensive education in Traditional Chinese and Integrative Medicine. Students build a foundation in our Master Level courses, and then go on to receive specialized training in our Doctoral Level courses.

Master’s Level Curriculum

Hands performing acupunctureMaster’s Level courses allow students to build a strong foundation in theory, and then put their knowledge into practice in clinical internship courses. The curriculum covers 6 distinct areas:

  • Acupuncture
  • Biomedicine
  • Integrative Medicine
  • Herbology
  • Oriental Medicine
  • Professional Practice

Course Descriptions

Doctoral Level Curriculum

Doctor studying a clipboard Doctoral Level courses offer more advanced and specialized study. The curriculum covers areas including:

  • Herbology
  • Functional Medicine
  • Advanced Clinic Skill
  • Adv. Orthopedics & Collaborative Care
  • Integrative Medicine
  • Doctoral Research

Course Descriptions

MASTER’S LEVEL COURSES

ACUPUNCTURE – MASTER’S LEVEL

Training in acupuncture begins in the first trimester with the first of four classes in the Acupuncture Channels and Points series covering the jing-luo system of channels and vessels that transport qi in the body. Students are introduced to the locations and functions of acupuncture points along the twelve regular channels, the Ren (Conception) and Du (Governing) extraordinary vessels, and the pathways, characteristics and functions of the regular channels, extraordinary vessels, muscle channels, divergent channels, and cutaneous regions.

The second trimester incorporates the art of acupuncture in the first of three classes in the Acupuncture Techniques series, which also covers moxibustion, cupping, gua sha spooning, warm needling, ear/scalp needling, and electrical stimulation (with an emphasis on safety). The first of the four-part Acupuncture Therapy series in the fourth trimester focuses on acupuncture treatment strategies. Students master classic TCM point-selection strategies, Master Tung-style acupuncture, extraordinary vessels, and attend a two-class series on Japanese-style acupuncture diagnosis and treatment.

Beginning in the seventh trimester, the Oriental Clinical Medicine series (which consists of four classes) engages students in classic TCM acupuncture approaches to treating different types of medical conditions. Students review and test their acupuncture knowledge in the tenth trimester with Advanced Case Studies and AOM Review classes.

ACUPUNCTURE CHANNELS & POINTS: AC 101 – 104

A core acupuncture series that teaches the locations and functions of acupuncture points along the twelve regular channels, the Ren (Conception) and Du (Governing) extraordinary vessels, and the pathways, characteristics, and functions of the regular channels, extraordinary vessels, muscle channels, divergent channels, and cutaneous regions. Also presents the actions and indications of points, concepts related to the five elements, yuan-source points, luo-connecting points, xi-cleft points, alarm points, the shu-connecting points of the back, influential points, window of the sky points, and ghost points.

Acupuncture Channels & Points I: AC 101
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Corequisite: OM 100
Focuses on acupuncture channel theory and the Ren (Conception), Du (Governing), Lung, and Large Intestine channels.

Acupuncture Channels & Points II: AC 102
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 101
Focuses on the Stomach, Spleen, Heart, Small Intestine, and Urinary Bladder channels.

Acupuncture Channels & Points III: AC 103
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 101
Focuses on Kidney, Pericardium, Triple Burner, Gall Bladder, and Liver channels.

Acupuncture Channels & Points IV: AC 104
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 101, 102 & 103
Focuses on the “extra points” outside of the regular channels, including common extra points and micro-systems (auricular, scalp, nose, hand, and foot), and special points used by Master Tung.

ACUPUNCTURE TECHNIQUES: AC 110/112/113

Advances development in the safe and efficacious application of Oriental Medicine by teaching the art and science of acupuncture techniques and other treatment modalities including moxibustion, cupping, gua sha spooning, and electrical stimulation.

Beginning Acupuncture Techniques: AC 110
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 101
Introduces fundamental theory, technical knowledge, and skills essential to the practice of acupuncture and other modalities of Oriental Medicine, including principles of hygiene, disinfection, sterilization, Clean Needle Technique (CNT), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) protocol and training, cautionary measures, contraindications, and the importance of informed consent. Includes assembly of student kits; practice in needle insertion and manipulation on vegetables and self; and education in the following: indirect and direct moxa; suction cups (including sliding techniques); electrostimulation, various styles of needling; magnets; beads; dermal friction; and gua sha (spooning).

Intermediate Acupuncture Techniques: AC 112
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 111
Incorporates exercises to improve needling and moxibustion techniques, develop protocols and methods to handle various needles, and cultivate an appropriate mentality, spirit, and mind for practice. Includes instruction in precise needling technique based on palpatory examination; methods for inducing “Qi Arrival” using both supporting and inserting hands; specialized acupuncture techniques such as the guide-tube system (Japanese-style needling); tonification and sedation techniques; Japanese-style moxibustion treatment; intradermal needling; cautions and contraindications to needling; and Clean Needle Technique (CNT) review.

Traditional Chinese Acupuncture Techniques: AC 113
3 units – 3-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 111
The third course in the Acupuncture Techniques series provides instruction and practice in advanced acupuncture techniques and needle manipulation skills including warm-needle and through-and-through needling; advanced points; classic Chinese needling techniques (Yang Yi Zhou, Nei Jing); tonification and sedation; and three-edged, cutaneous, intra-dermal, and electrical stimulation.

WESTERN BIOMEDICINE- MASTER’S LEVEL

Our basic science courses provide the foundation knowledge of western concepts that form part of our integrative medicine curriculum. Of partiocular importance are studies related to anatomy/physiology and pathophysiology.

Chemistry: BS 013
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Examines general concepts in organic and inorganic chemistry, as well as thinking processes associated with the practice of science. The course emphasizes a broad understanding of chemical events in living systems in terms of metabolism and structure-function relationships of biologically important molecules. Topics include periodic tables and atomic structures, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, moles/molecular weight, acid/base PH, ionic balance, gases and gas laws, solutions/solubility, and quantum dynamics.

Integrative Medical Biology: BS 021
2 units – 2 hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Introduces principles of human biology with a focus on cellular systems, metabolism, body structure and function, genetics and evolution, and basic concepts in botany.

Conceptual Physics: BS 040
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
This course explores the basic principles of physics (thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and light) and applies them to the functions of the human body and the modern world. The course explores how specific concepts of physics can be used to explain aspects of anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology. The course also examines the areas where theories of physics overlap with the philosophies of Oriental Medicine.

Anatomy & Physiology I & II: BS 121 & 122
4 units each – 4-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Develops an integrated picture of human anatomy and physiology, including the integumentary system, membranes, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, the special senses, endocrine system, circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and the reproductive system. Also introduces the anatomical landmarks of bones and muscles in order to facilitate the learning of acupuncture points. *Courses may be taken in any sequence.

Pathophysiology I – III: BS 141 – 143
3 units each – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: BS 121 & 122
Presents pathologic mechanisms of disease and the adverse effects of disease on specific tissues and organ systems on a gross and microscopic level. Teaches fundamental terminology, concepts, and mechanisms such as cell injury and adaptation, inflammation, genetic disease, neoplasia and immunity, as well as specific organ-based diseases of the respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, liver, gall bladder, and pancreatic systems. *Courses may be taken in any sequence.

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE – MASTER’S LEVEL

Integrative Medicine instruction provides a solid foundation for the unification of Eastern and Western medical sciences. Students develop fluency in both medical languages and systems beginning in the first trimester with an introduction to Western Medical Terminology. The third trimester outlines both Eastern and Western approaches to nutrition. Fourth- and fifth-trimester study extends beyond the language to focus on the procedures and methods of Western physical examination and the basics of pharmacotherapeutics, which encompasses the uses and effects of Western drugs. Students also receive training in CPR and First Aid.

In the sixth trimester students begin a four-class series in Clinical Integrative Medicine and a four-class series in Oriental Clinical Medicine. Together these series provide a wide perspective on the treatment of medical conditions. Integrative Medicine focuses on diagnosis and standards of care from a biomedicinal perspective, with a special emphasis on referrals and “red-flag” cases.

Oriental Clinical Medicine covers the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions including gynecology, obstetrics, urology, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, immunology, oncology, endocrinology, cardiology, respiratory disorders, neurology, pediatrics, dermatology, and ophthalmology, along with the associated Oriental Medicine patterns of disharmony.

Western Medical Terminology: IM 105
1 unit – 1-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Introduces the vocabulary of Western biological science, medicine, and medical practice, including terminology related to the various tissues and systems of the human body within the context of anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Also provides an emphasis on Greek and Latin word roots.

Nutrition: East & West: IM 111
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: OM 100
Develops an understanding of both Western and Eastern perspectives on nutrition by teaching basic nutritional concepts (including biochemistry of foods, vitamins and minerals, and physiology of digestion), proper nutrition, and common Western and Chinese medicinal foods useful in treating specific symptoms and patterns of disharmony.

Western Physical Examination: IM 120
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: BS 121, 122 & three (3) units from BS 141 – 143
Teaches students to conduct and complete a physical examination and write a patient record accurately and concisely. Discusses differential diagnoses of commonly encountered symptoms and introduces common lab tests and diagnostic images as they relate to the physical presentation of symptoms.

Pharmacology: IM 130
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: BS 012 and three (3) units from BS 141 – 143
Outlines the pharmacology of therapeutic agents, including the basic principles of drug actions. Trains students to analyze symptoms in regards to the effects and side effects of drugs, and discusses specific drug groups affecting the central nervous system, autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and digestive systems, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. Also discusses the concept of drug-herb interactions, including potentiating effects, diminishing efficacy, and side effects.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation & First Aid: IM 140
0.5 units – 8-hour class Prerequisites: none
Teaches the skills required to recognize cardiopulmonary emergencies and restore breath and pulse. Also covers the basic principles of blood-borne pathogens and first aid.

Research Methodology: IM 150
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: AC 111; OM 100; BS 121 – 122
Focuses on the basics of research methodology and the role of research in the practice of evidence-based medicine. Teaches the scientific basis of Oriental Medicine efficacy and prepares students to complete a literature review on an Oriental Medicine topic of their choosing.

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE SERIES I: IM 281 – 284

The culmination of didactic education at AIMC Berkeley, this portion of the Integrative Medicine series features classes that emphasize both Eastern and Western disease recognition and management. Students learn appropriate case management, including primary care, secondary/specialty care, treatment planning, referral, collaboration, continuity of care, prognosis and future medical care, follow-up, contraindications and complications, medicolegal report writing, independent medical review, expert medical testimony, special care/seriously ill patients, emergency procedures, and psychosocial assessment.

Classes in the 200 series focus on Western Medicine, and classes in the 300 series focus on Oriental Medicine. For the most efficacious learning, classes should be taken in the following pairs: IM 282 and 301; IM 283 and 303; IM284 and 302. *Courses may be taken in any sequence.

Biomedicine I: Integrative Orthopedics: IM 171
4 units – 4 hours lecture/practical Prerequisites: AC 101 – 103; IM 120
Focuses on orthopedic and neurological assessment techniques, charting, treatment and/or referral of musculoskeletal pain and treatment modalities, including classical acupuncture points and combinations, electro-acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, spooning (gua sha), seven-star needle and external liniments. Also discusses the use of X-rays and other relevant diagnostic images, recognition of the need for surgical intervention, and post-surgical management and recovery.

Biomedicine II & III: Internal Medicine: IM 282 & 283
3 units each – 3 hours lecture Prerequisites: BS 141 – 143; IM 120
IM 282 focuses on clinical presentations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the following conditions: common cold, cough, asthma, epigastric pain, vomiting, abdominal pain, jaundice, hypochondriac pain, low back pain, palpitations, insomnia, diarrhea, constipations, headache, edema, painful urination, syncoe, ALOC, paralysis, and chest pain. IM 283 focuses on the clinical presentations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the following conditions: Joint pain, impotence, depression, bipolar disorder, seizures, mouth ulcers, diabetes, obesity, pediatric seizures, pediatric malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, urticaria, shingles, hernia, goiter and thyroid disease, nasal congestion and sinusitis, tinnitus, deafness, and toothache, as well as general cancer and end of life issues.

Biomedicine IV: Clinical Gynecology: IM 284
3 units – 3 hours lecture Prerequisites: BS 141 – 143; IM 120
Comprehensively examines the female reproductive system, gynecological disorders, pregnancy and complications of pregnancy, as well as fertility issues and modern Western medical management of infertility in males and females.

Biomedicine Review: PE 230
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: IM 171 three (3) units from IM 282-284.
Features a comprehensive review of Western Clinical Medicine, including differential diagnosis, red flag signs and symptoms, emergency management of patients in the AOM setting, necessary referrals, labs and diagnostic imaging, and Biomedical standards of care. Also prepares students for the Comprehensive Exit Exam, California Acupuncture Licensing Exam (CALE), and NCCAOM certification exams.

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE SERIES II: IM 301 – 304

Oriental Clinical Medicine: Internal Medicine I & II: IM 301 & 303
3 units each – 3 hours lecture Prerequisites: OM 171, 172 & 173; 6 units of OH 201 – 203
Teaches students to assess common clinical signs and symptoms with a focus on Oriental Medicine. Emphasizes differential diagnosis, critical assessment, recognition of red flag signs and symptoms, classic acupuncture point prescriptions and herbal formulas. Utilizes case studies to illustrate concepts. *Courses may be taken in any sequence.

IM 301 covers Common Cold, Cough, Asthma, Epigastric Pain, Vomiting, Hiccoughs, Abdominal Pain, Jaundice, Hypochondriac Pain, Low Back Pain, Palpitations, Insomnia, Dysentery, Diarrhea, Constipation, Headache, Edema, Painful Urination, Dizziness, Syncope, Wind Stroke, and Facial Paralysis.

IM 303 covers bi syndrome, wei syndrome, impotence, depression, manic-depression, epilepsy, mouth ulcer, diabetes, obesity, shoulder pain, infantile convulsion, mumps, infantile diarrhea, infantile malnutrition, urticaria, herpes (shingles), intestinal abscess, hernia (shan Qi), goiter, sinusitis and nasal congestion, tinnitus and deafness, and toothache.

Oriental Clinical Medicine: Gynecology: IM 302
4 units – 4 hours lecture Prerequisites: AC 201; OH 201 – 203; OM 151, 152 & 160
Comprehensively examines the female reproductive system, gynecological disorders, pregnancy and complications of pregnancy. Emphasizes Chinese Medicine differential pattern diagnosis, classic acupuncture point prescriptions, and herbal formulas. Also discusses Chinese Medicine patterns of male and female infertility, as well as
treatment and management.

Oriental Clinical Medicine: Modern Diseases: IM 304
3 units – 3 hours lecture Prerequisites: Six (6) units of OH 201 – 203; OM 171, 172& 173
Focuses on Western medical diseases that have been discovered in the past 50 years and/or have developed to epidemic proportions, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension, infertility, and HIV. Teaches the use of Oriental Medicine for treatment, with an emphasis on current research.

ORIENTAL HERBOLOGY- MASTER’S LEVEL

Education in herbal medicine starts in the first trimester with an introduction to Herbology and the traditional Chinese herbal categories. The second and third trimesters detail over 350 single herbs, including their functions, indications, dosages, contraindications, temperatures, and channels entered.

Classes in the fourth, fifth, and sixth trimesters educate students on how to combine single herbs to make over 150 formulas — including traditional functions, clinical indications, modifications, combinations, and contraindications — and focuses on the activity of individual herbs within the formulas. During this time students also learn about herb-drug interactions and mislabeling. The sixth trimester Oriental Clinical Medicine series introduces students to classic and modern prescriptions for treating different types of medical conditions within orthopedics, gynecology, traumatology, and internal medicine. Students review and test their herbal knowledge in the tenth trimester with Advanced Case Studies and AOM Review classes.

Introduction to Oriental Herbs OH 099
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Develops an overview of Chinese Pinyin specifically for the study of the Chinese herbs. Also provides an introduction to Classical medical literature; a history of the Chinese Materia Medica (including the twenty-seven categories and the primary herbs in each category); herbal formulas; politics and safety; and the basic concepts of Chinese herb directions, flavors, nature, preparations, and dosing.

Oriental Herbology: OH 101
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisite: OM 100; OH 099
Focuses on herbs that release exterior, clear heat, cool blood, purge fire, detoxify, dry dampness, clear summer heat, dispel wind dampness, drain dampness, drain downward, transform heat and clear phlegm, alleviate wheezing, warm the interior, and alleviate food stagnation.

Oriental Herbology II: OH 102
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisite: OM 100; OH 099
Focuses on herbs that regulate Qi, aromatically transform dampness, expel parasites, calm the spirit, tonify Qi, blood, yin and yang, invigorate blood, and stop bleeding, aromatically open the orifices, stop wind and tremor, astringe, and herbs that are externally applied.

HERBAL PRESCRIPTION: OH 201 – 203
Features a comprehensive study of the traditional Oriental Medicine formulas according to therapeutic categories. Introduces 150 formulas, including traditional functions, clinical indications, modifications, and contraindications, along with the activity of individual herbs within the formulas. Emphasizes the importance of specific herb pairings (Dui Yao) and formula modifications, and includes case studies that illustrate patterns of disharmony, treatment principles and methods, appropriate formula prescription, and modification. *Courses may be taken in any sequence.

Herbal Prescription I: OH 201
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: OH 101 & 102; OM 171 & 172
Focuses on formulas that alleviate exterior conditions, harmonize, treat dampness and phlegm, warm interior cold, reduce food stagnation, and expel parasites.

Herbal Prescription II: OH 202
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: OH 101 & 102; OM 171 & 172
Focuses on formulas that tonify, invigorate the blood, stabilize and bind, stop bleeding, calm the spirit, and expel wind.

Herbal Prescription III: OH 203
3 units – 3-hour lecture ∙ Prerequisites: OH& 102; OM 171 & 172
Focuses on formulas that clear heat, drain downward, expel damp, and regulate the Qi.

Herbal Prescription: Formula Writing and Modifications: OH 206
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: OH 201, 202 & 207; IM 302. Instructs students in writing and modifying herbal prescriptions using traditional formulas, herb combinations, and customization of single herbs in an effort to better understand and utilize the ancient tradition of Chinese herbal medicine. Utilizes case studies to illustrate concepts.

Herbal Prescription: Prepared Formulas: OH 207
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: OH 201, 202 & 203
Provides an overview of how to combine and prescribe formulas using tea pills and prepared powders with an emphasis on the traditional formulae from which today’s modern patents are derived, and ancient and modern modification trends.

ORIENTAL MEDICINE – MASTER’S LEVEL

Oriental Medicine (OM) theory is the keystone of understanding in Oriental Medicine. Students are immersed in the study of OM theory in the first trimester with a comprehensive course that outlines its fundamental concepts. Students receive in-depth training in Oriental Medicine diagnosis as they begin to practice in concurrent clinic observation classes.

Traditional Oriental Medicine Theory: OM 100
4 units – 4-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Outlines the fundamental concepts of Oriental Medicine, including yin/yang theory, zang-fu organ theory, vital substances, Qi transformation, five elements theory, and the causes of internal and external disease. Also includes an introduction to diagnosis (looking, hearing and smelling, asking, and feeling) and pattern identification (eight principles, Qi/blood/body fluids, internal organ zang-fu). Utilizes case studies to illustrate concepts.

Chinese Medical Terminology: OM 101
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Students will master basic salutations & 5 sentences essential to clinical practice and travel in China/Taiwan. Students will be introduced to common cross-cultural mis-communications and learn how to avoid them. Students will learn to differentiate aurally between Mandarin, Cantonese, & other Asian languages (such as Japanese, Korean, etc.) Students will acquire resources for further study in Chinese language/culture and learn how to use them. Character Recognition & Writing: Students will learn how to recognize traditional and simplified Chinese characters in a number of different fonts. Students will use the 4 treasures (brush, ink, paper, inkstone) to write TCM-related vocabulary in seal script, official script and walking script. Students will practice hand-eye coordination, posture, & breathing techniques. Students will learn how the history of written Chinese informs TCM medical concepts.

Qigong: OM 111
1 unit – 1-hour lecture/practical Corequisite: OM 100
Introduces experiential knowledge related to Oriental Medicine energetics and the concept of Qi through Qigong and taijiquan. Teaches exercises for health maintenance and creating balance, breathing exercises for organ detoxification, and tips on how to become more centered and focused.

Oriental Medicine Bodywork: Tuina: OM 131
2 units – 2-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: OM 100
Outlines the basic methods and principles of tui na (including myofascial release) through lecture and hands-on practice for use as a treatment modality in clinical practice.

Oriental Medicine Bodywork: Shiatsu: OM 132
2 units – 2-hour lecture/practical Prerequisites: OM 100
Outlines the basic methods and principles of shiatsu (including myofascial release) through lecture and hands-on practice for use as a treatment modality in clinical practice.

Diagnosis Theory I: OM 171
4 units each – 4-hour lecture Prerequisites: OM 100; Co-requisite: OM 173
Discusses the methods of diagnosis to help identify patterns of imbalance and make a differential Oriental medical diagnosis. Diagnostic patterns include eight principles, Qi/blood/body fluids, internal organ zang-fu, pathogenic factors, five elements, acupuncture channel, six stages, four levels, and three burners. Utilizes case studies to illustrate concepts.

Diagnosis Theory II: OM 172
3 units each – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: OM 100; Co-requisite: OM 173
Discusses the methods of diagnosis to help identify patterns of imbalance and make a differential Oriental medical diagnosis. Diagnostic patterns include eight principles, Qi/blood/body fluids, internal organ zang-fu, pathogenic factors, five elements, acupuncture channel, six stages, four levels, and three burners. Utilizes case studies to illustrate concepts.

Tongue & Pulse Diagnosis Practicum: OM 173
2 units – 2 hours lecture/practical ∙ Prerequisites: OM 100
Illustrates methods of examination—looking, hearing and smelling, asking, and feeling—with special emphasis on pulse palpation and tongue observation to identify patterns of imbalance and make a differential Oriental medical diagnosis.

Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine Review: OM 300
3 units – 3-hour lecture Prerequisites: completion of trimesters 1 – 8
Focuses on preparing students for the Comprehensive Exam, California Acupuncture Licensing Exam (CALE), and NCCAOM certification exams with an inclusive AOM review that emphasizes differential diagnosis of Chinese Medicine patterns, CAM-based point prescriptions, commonly used herbal formulas, emergency management, and red flag signs and symptoms.

Clinical Case Review: OM 303
2 units – 60 hours total Prerequisites: BS 141-143; IM 120, 130, 171 & 302; CP 211
Through the use of case studies, students learn to correlate Chinese medicine patterns and biomedicine disease identification, integrative treatment management, referrals, and lab/diagnostic image ordering. Advanced practice in writing adnndopriate dietary and lifestyle recommendations is also gained.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE & ETHICS – MASTER’S LEVEL

This series of classes teaches students how to be successful in the workplace by developing a comprehension of and context in which students will practice medicine as primary health care providers, and the responsibilities involved therein. Included is a discussion of legal and ethical responsibilities, and an in-depth developmental study of practical counseling and communication skills.

Public Health incorporates education relevant to public health and the role of Oriental Medicine in healthcare today. Practice Management is an introduction to the professional landscape and an overview of the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to be successful in practice, and students tackle the nuts-and-bolts of setting up and running a private practice by creating their own business plan. Students are guided in the development of understanding their individual interests through role-playing, job shadowing, and public presentation, and taught how to translate their specialties and practice styles into relevant and profitable market niches.

Patient Counseling & Psychology: PE 201
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: none
Develops interpersonal and counseling skills relevant for primary care, with a focus on relationship as the foundation of medicine. Emphasizes management and referral of patients with psychiatric and substance use disorders, including emergent conditions and use of behavioral medicine techniques for enhancing regimen adherence and lifestyle change. Discusses general psychological principles and common disorders as defined by the DSM IV criteria, differential diagnosis, pharmacological treatments, emergency treatment, and long-term patient management.

Ethics & Law: PE 210
1 unit – 1-hour lecture Prerequisites: CP 012
Teaches legal and ethical issues that may arise in the clinical practice setting of a Licensed Acupuncturist, including regulatory compliance, jurisprudence, and peer review. Introduces AIMC culture and vision, professional activism, and the AIMC Berkeley practitioner oath.

Public Health & Oriental Medicine: PE 220
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites: AC 111
Investigates Oriental Medicine and public health as it relates to community health and disease prevention while also increasing student awareness of at-risk populations, drug addictions, communicable diseases, public health alerts, and epidemiology. Includes an overview and practice of the NADA acupuncture protocol.

Practice Management: PE 330
2 units – 2-hour lecture Prerequisites:None
Focuses on developing students’ communication skills in self-promotion and public education by exploring strategies for networking and advertising, including websites, printed materials, events, presentations, professional associations, and word-of-mouth and guerrilla marketing A synthesis of information gained in Practice Building and Clinical Practice, Practice Management prepares students to establish and run their own practices according to the statutes and regulations governing the practice of acupuncture in California. Students develop their own business plans and discuss front office set-up, supplies and inventory, patient files, record keeping, patient follow-up, the establishment of referral networks, practicing in interdisciplinary offices and hospitals, malpractice insurance, CPT/ICD-9 coding, billing issues, workers’ compensation, personal injury, sales and taxes.

Doctoral Level Courses

DAIM doctoral courses dive deeper into Integrative Medicine, providing advanced and specialized training on the utilization of both traditional and contemporary medicine.

HERBOLOGY – DOCTORAL LEVEL / COMPLETION TRACK

Pharmacognosy: OH 410
2.0 units – 30 lecture hours This course prepares the integrative herbalist to utilize available databases compiling research, discuss the major categories of chemical constituents of herbs and their actions, competently research herb, drug and nutrient interactions and apply this knowledge to the safe and efficacious prescription of herbal formulas. The student will be able to skillfully communicate with a range of healthcare providers about the safety, efficacy and potential interactions of herbs and herbal formulas. In addition, the student will be able to demonstrate effective counseling and educational techniques to increase compliance, safety and efficacy of herbal prescribing and improve patient outcomes.

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE – DOCTORAL LEVEL/ COMPLETION TRACK

Diagnostic Studies in Clinical Practice: IM 470
1.0 unit – 15 lecture hours
This course provides a comprehensive overview and application of the role of labs in the practice of integrative medicine. Students will understand the use of lab tests and imaging in clinical practice, be able to interpret lab findings and identify needed tests, read imaging reports and work as part of an integrative care team. Students will be able to identify allopathic, functional and naturopathic perspectives on the interpretation of lab findings, as well as describe a number of options for patients to obtain lab testing.

Nutritional Strategies in Integrative Medicine: IM 410
1.0 unit – 15 lecture hours
Functional medicine is a perspective that integrates the most useful tools and techniques of Bio medicine with the systems based approaches of traditional medicine to improve the diagnosis and treatment of modern and functional disorders, including impaired detoxification, autoimmune disorders, food allergies, immune dysfunction, chronic viral infection, endocrine imbalances and more. This class provides an overview of the systems‐based approach with a focus on whole foods‐based nutritional therapy.

Integrative Medicine in Practice: IM 510
1.0 unit – 15 lecture hours– pre: IM 410
This class concentrates on the advanced application of research, herbal medicine, nutrition counseling and diet and lifestyle advice along with acupuncture to treat complex internal disorders in the context of collaborative care. The integrative treatment of infertility, mental disorders and addiction, autoimmune disorders, endocrine disorders and pediatric disorders will be discussed.

Advanced Orthopedics and Pain Management: IM 571
2.5 units – 37.5 lecture hours
This class develops the application of acupuncture for orthopedic problems and pain with the application of integrative and advanced needling techniques including trigger point acupuncture, Dr. Tan’s and Master Tung’s needling systems, dry needling, auricular therapy, scalp acupuncture, electro stimulation and more. The student will be able to incorporate the tools and techniques of allopathic neurologic and orthopedic testing to enhance patient diagnosis, treatment and case management, as well as prescribe appropriate therapeutic exercises for rehabilitation and pain management. In addition, students will be able to appropriately manage patient care within the worker’s compensation system as well as modify treatment protocols and plans based on current research.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE – DOCTORAL LEVEL / COMPLETION TRACK

Integrative Practice Building: PE 521
1.5 units – 22.5 lecture hours
This course exposes students to the broad scope of career and practice options in integrative medicine, and prepares them to successfully manage patient care in a variety of settings. Students will identify areas of professional weakness and explore ways to re-mediate them, as well as develop plans for lifelong learning. The course explores the
challenges and opportunities the integrative practitioner faces in delivering and coordinating healthcare within various systems, providing collaborative care and communicating effectively with other health care practitioners. Students will practice an array of skills important to patient education, community outreach, career development and collaborative care, such as public speaking, case presentations, report writing, creating and maintaining a referral network and inter-professional communication.

RESEARCH – DOCTORAL LEVEL / COMPLETION TRACK

Doctoral Research Project: IM 450
1.5 unit – 22.5 lecture hours
This course initiates the doctoral research project, in which students make a substantial contribution to clinical research and/ or scholarship in integrative medicine. The student will be able to describe a range of options for the doctoral project, including case study review, meta‐analysis, clinical research study, literature review and more. Students will identify and assemble a doctoral advisory committee, submit and revise their thesis project proposal and commence their research.

Doctoral Research Thesis Presentation: IM 550
1.0 unit – 15 lecture hours – pre: IM 450
Students make an original contribution to scholarship and research in the field of integrative medicine. Students carry out the doctoral project initiated in IM 550 and prepare, present and defend it to the members of their doctoral committee. They document their research in a final paper suitable for publication.

ADVANCED CLINICAL SKILLS – DOCTORAL LEVEL / COMPLETION TRACK

Internship IV: CP 411
2.23 units ‐ 67 clinic hours
This course series builds on the skills attained in the previous levels of clinical internship, incorporating the additional doctoral level competencies which enable the integrative practitioner to utilize the full scope of practice of the licensed acupuncturist, including ordering and interpreting lab work and diagnostic imaging, giving effective nutrition advice and exercise counseling, collaborating with various types of practitioners in patient care and incorporating scholarship, research, evidence‐based and functional medicine into practice. Clinical supervisors are available for consultation during the intake and treatment of patients.

Internship V: CP 511
2.23 units ‐ 67 clinic hours – pre-requisite: CP 411
This course series builds on the skills attained in the previous levels of clinical internship, incorporating the additional doctoral level competencies which enable the integrative practitioner to utilize the full scope of practice of the licensed acupuncturist, including ordering and interpreting lab work and diagnostic imaging, giving effective nutrition advice and exercise counseling, collaborating with various types of practitioners in patient care and incorporating scholarship, research, evidence‐based and functional medicine into practice. Clinical supervisors are available for consultation during the intake and treatment of patients.

Testimonials

"One of my favorite things about AIMC is the sense of community. We come together to support each other through challenges. Instead of a sense of competitiveness between students, there is a caring community that lifts everybody up. The faculty and staff are approachable and provide wonderful support during your graduate journey.

- Master’s Student

Acupuncture & Integrative
Medicine College, Berkeley

2550 Shattuck Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94704

ADMISSIONS: 510-859-1300
CLINIC: 510-666-8248